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Want to tell a Donald Trump supporter from a Hillary Clinton voter? See how many coupons they clip.

Trump fans are using coupons more often and have less education than their Clinton counterparts, says news and analysis center Opportunity Research. On average, Trump supporters are using almost five coupons in a month, while Clinton supporters are cashing in only 3.2 coupons over 30 days.

But it’s Clinton supporters that take the edge in almost everything else. Clinton supporters average a full year more of college education than their Trump counterparts — 3.9 years to 2.9 years, respectively. You might think that suggests many Trump supporters didn’t go to college, bringing the average down, but that’s not entirely the case. The study shows 83 percent of Clinton supporters attended college for at least one year, and 77 percent of Trump supporters did, too. That suggests there are more college dropouts supporting Trump.

And aside from the 65 and older crowd, every age group from 18-65 is more likely to support Clinton — the vast majority being 25-34-year-olds. In fact, among the older millennials, 66 percent admit to being more likely to vote for Clinton.

Baby boomers, those 65 and older, are the only age group to favor Trump: 55 percent admit they’ll be voting for him in November, while 45 percent say they’re casting their ballot for Clinton.

Trump and Clinton supporters handle money very differently

While Trump supporters have less education and earn less money, they have slightly better money management than Clinton fans. Among Trump voters, 68.6 percent have good or excellent credit, while 67 percent of Clinton supporters can say the same about their scores. Just over 20 percent of Trump’s base have bad credit, while 25.7 percent of Clinton voters have bad credit.

When it comes to education, more Clinton supporters have the bills to show what they’ve been through. The average student loan debt for Clinton supporters are $14,078, while among Trump fans, it’s $7,837 — almost half. That number starts to make sense with the new information that Trump supporters complete less college. Along with that, 18 percent of Trump fans have student loans, while 33 percent of Clinton supporters do.

Money talks, but are candidates talking about money?

Last month, when the two candidates got together for the first debate, money came up, but only briefly. Clinton talked about continuing the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, raising the minimum wage, and expanding paid family leave. Trump, for his part, pledged to lower taxes for businesses and renegotiate trade deals. But it wasn’t long before the bickering and personal attacks dominated the clock.

While it didn’t come up much at the debate, both candidates have different takes on how they would handle student loan debt, now nearly $1.3 trillion. Clinton admits student loan debt is crushing Americans, while Trump University told students to go into credit card debt to receive instruction.

Trump says federal aid grants should be abolished and student loan assistance should go to private banks. Clinton’s New College Compact plan would eliminate tax loopholes and distribute $350 billion to fund state grants and relieve some student debt.

When it comes to repayment, Clinton says there will be income-based programs and after 20 years of repayment, the remaining debt will be forgiven. Trump only just debuted a student loan plan last week amidst all the claims of sexual misconduct, and it’s only a small tweak to Obama’s, offering forgiveness at a shorter 15 years but requiring higher payments.