Around the web

This week around the web

1. 10 Best American Vacation Towns to Live In Year-Round

Money Crashers — We’ve given advice on staycations that don’t suck before, but we never thought to suggest moving somewhere awesome. Brian Martucci did, and looked up everything you need to know about some beautiful, but not overcrowded tourist towns: unemployment rates, average commutes, cost of living, the whole works. Moving to Logan, Utah now.

2. Pop Quiz: Terrorists Destroy Your Home. Will the Insurance Company Pay?

Money Talks News — Yep. “So long as it’s just a standard explosion, and we aren’t at war,” says Maryalene LaPonsie. The post and embedded video go into detail about several crazy situations where insurance may or may not cover your stuff, all in the name of teaching you what you really get for your money.

3. The Spending That Makes You Happy

The Simple Dollar — Being frugal doesn’t mean hating your life, as Trent Hamm explains: “Frugality means that you cut back hard on the things you don’t care about so that you have money for the things that you do care about.” He also has a great anecdote about enjoying an occasional coffee more than a daily one.

4. We Sold the House! Here’s How I’m Investing the $400,000

Mr. Money Mustache — “The best time to invest in stocks was long ago. The second best time is today,” says the anonymous and eponymous Mr. Money Mustache. He explains why he hesitates to put the money into the stock market, even though he knows it’s the right thing to do for the long run. He also takes a close look at historical periods where people expected the stock market to crash — and it didn’t.

5. 5 Reasons To Keep Your Finances Separate From Your Significant Other

Money Under 30 — Phil Villarreal looks at some practical reasons to marry, but not marry finances. It’s the flip side of a piece the site ran two weeks ago explaining how to best merge your money. Clearly Phil is not swayed by emotion: He says tracking overspending with a combined checking account “can require CSI-level scene reconstructions, going over conversations, forgotten promises and circumstantial evidence.”

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